"Remembering what play is all about and making it part of our daily lives are probably the most important factors in being a fulfilled human being.  -Dr. Stuart Brown 

Yvonne Downing, LPN
Healer, Hoop Dance Teacher, & Self-Care Advocate

Yvonne Downing is a licensed practical nurse, a dental assistant, an x-ray technician, a hoop dancer, and self care advocate. She is the creator of Hooping It Out where she teaches hoop dance as a powerful form of self care through body play in her community of Millville, New Jersey. She compassionately leads women through the artistic movement meditation practice of hoop dance, guiding women to feel empowered to develop more self-confidence and self-acceptance of their body while exploring the joys of self-expression. She is also a certified Hooping with Kids Instructor where she guides children to experience joy through hula hooping. Yvonne’s hoop dance has been described, as energetic, inspiring, heartfelt, and simply put, beautiful.


For over 17 years, Yvonne has dedicated her healing work as a nurse in the areas of long-term care, mental health, and palliative care. In addition, Yvonne has a special interest in working with caregivers who provide care to Alzheimer’s patients, due to Yvonne's own personal experience in caring for her sweet mother, who passed away from Alzheimer’s years ago.

Currently, Yvonne provides compassionate nursing care to patients within a nursing home. She is very excited to share FANA’s mission within her community and is working on developing a self-care hoop meditation class for nurses. 

Of all animal species, humans are the biggest players of all. We are built to play and built through play. When we play, we are engaged in the purest expression of our humanity, the truest expression of our individuality. 

-Dr. Stuart Brown

Laurel Prince, RN, BSN
Healer, Hoop Dancer, Writer, & Self-Care Advocate


Laurel Prince is a Registered Nurse at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) Medical Center Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center. She serves as patient advocate and healer for patients experiencing advanced heart failure, pre and post-op heart and lung transplants, coronary artery bypass surgery, pulmonary hypertension and cancer. She has practiced Yoga for over 10 years and recently in 2015 was introduced to the healing art of hoop dancing as an embodied movement meditation self-care body play practice to prevent burnout and compassion fatigue and has experienced a powerful personal transformation through the practice of joy replenishment through body play. 

Laurel attended Hoop Camp Retreats in 2015 with her hoop dance teacher and colleague Caroline Sánchez. At this amazing retreat, Caroline and Laurel met with nurses in attendance. It was through the interaction with nurses at this retreat where Caroline, creator of The Hula Hoop Girl had the inspiration to form a community of nurses who practice flow arts for self-care and the Flow Arts Nurses Association (FANA) was born. Laurel is an inspirational writer, healer, dancer, and author for the Flow Arts Association.

"We need Joy as we need air. 

We need Love as we need water. 

We need each other as we need the Earth we share."

-Maya Angelou

Jaclyn Munro, RN, RMT

Healer, Hoop Dancer, Massage Therapist 


Jaclyn Munro is a Registered Nurse, Massage Therapist and Hoopdancer in New Brunswick, Canada.

She is currently working at the Grand Manan Community Hospital and at the New Brunswick Heart Center in Saint John Regional Hospital. 

A gypsy nurse, she has a diverse background in Pediatrics, rural Emergency Room, Palliative & Long-term Care, and most recently Cardiac Surgical Care.  Her background in massage therapy allows her to take a holistic approach when caring for her patients. She is passionate about health promotion, self-care and injury prevention and regularly volunteers to share her passion and knowledge with the youth at Grand Manan Community School.

 Jaclyn was first introduced to the art of hoop dance in 2009, using it to unwind from the stress of nursing school. What started as innocent play- turned into something deeply connected, meaningful, replenishing and joyful. She is passionate about introducing nurses and health care workers to the joy and restorative benefits of hoop dance. Jaclyn can almost always been found with a trunk full of hoops, ready to laugh, play, and share the joys of hooping.

Dance is the hidden language of the soul

 -Martha Graham 

Flow Arts for Nurses 

Caroline P. Cárdenas, RN, MSN, CBCN, RYT 200 hr

Healer, Movement Guide for Women's Empowerment, Hoop Dancer, Producer, Writer, Joy Advocate


Sweet Caroline is the creator of 
The Hula Hoop Girl and founder of FANA. She has been hoop dancing for joy replenishment for over 10 years and has been an oncology certified registered nurse for over 12 years in her community of La Jolla, California. Her ecstatic hoop dance flow has been described as mesmerizing, inspiring, whimsical, and Graceful. Her teaching style is authentic, nurturing, playful and empowering. She is a powerful movement guide, leading women to connect with their own unique rhythmic expressions to move through grief and joy. She is a poet, a writer, an Earth advocate, and a women's advocate. Her life’s work as an Embodied Movement Meditation Educator and Nurse Educator is soulfully dedicated to guiding women to connect with their body, their unique rhythm, and their movements to dance in the center of their joy feeling empowered to share their unique soul gifts with the world. 

Founders & Authors of FANA

Laurel Prince, RN, BSN

Caroline Cárdenas, RN, MSN, CBCN, RYT 200hr

“The truth is that play seems to be one of the most advanced methods nature has invented to allow a complex brain to create itself.”

-Dr. Stuart Brown

Flow Arts Nurses Association (FANA)

The Flow Arts Nurses Association (FANA) was born from the belief and necessity that self care is essential to those who practice the art of nursing.  Our aim is to promote self care through body play, dancing, and the flow arts.  Flow arts is practiced through body play, which fosters present-moment awareness.


“The Flow Arts draw from a multitude of ancient and modern movement disciplines from Maori poi spinning to modern firedancing, from martial arts and tai chi to circus arts, hula hooping and dancing.”


Flow arts allows the practitioner respite from the linear, cognitive intelligence and offers a chance to experience body-centered present moment awareness through imaginative play, body play, and creative expression.  It has been our collective experience that practicing flow arts allows us to reconnect with body, mind, and soul through joy replenishment, which brings more creativity and joy to our work as healers.    



Mission Statement

The mission of FANA is simple.  First and foremost we wish to promote self care among nurses, regardless of the medium. Secondly we wish to use flow arts as a platform to promote body play and movement.  Finally we wish to use this platform to bring a new paradigm to the nursing profession.  We believe that caring for others is not sustainable without some form of self care.  There is much research to support the necessity of self care for nurses.  Nursing schools across the country are beginning to teach courses on self care to nursing students for prevention of burnout and compassion fatigue.  While this is laudable our goal is to reach nurses who are already practicing professionals.  Many practicing nurses have not been in school for years.  Some nurses may be unaware or are new to the research supporting the importance of self care for nurses.  FANA aims to share the power of self care through body play to all nurses for joy replenishment to prevent burnout and compassion fatigue to foster quality of life and sustenance within the art of nursing. 

Policy Goals

FANA believes strongly that self care is a moral imperative for nurses.  This statement aligns with the ANA code of ethics published in 2015.  FANA is working towards allowing nurses to receive continuing education (CE) units for conferences, workshops, and training related to self care practices.  



Join FANA

Join our fun and amazing group of Flow Arts Nurses who seek to practice self care through body play for joy replenishment in balancing the mind, body, and soul to prevent burnout and compassion fatigue.



How to Join FANA

If you are a nurse, and are interested in learning more about FANA and/or would like to become part of FANA, fill out the 'Join FANA' application below and submit your answers. With your submission, you might be featured on the FANA website. We are excited to have you join us to continue to grow this circle through the power of play!


Spread the word to nurses in your area of the power of self care through body play for joy replenishment and join FANA. 


When you join FANA, you could be featured as a FANA member on this page with your bio and photo. 


Let's grow this circle of Joy Advocates through body play and let's dance in center of our joy as healthy and happy nurses together! ​




Criteria & Application for Joining FANA

  • Must be a licensed RN or LVN (LPN) and/or Nursing Student enrolled in a Nursing Program

  • Must have a regular self care body play practice of a flow art and/or dancing (i.e. Hoop Dancing, Poi, Staff, Yoga, Silk, Acro Yoga, Slack-line, Roller-Skating, ANY type of movement meditation that is JOYFUL)

  • Must fill out the 'Join FANA Application' and submit. 


Meet the Members of FANA 

Nursing is a profession based on the principle and practice of giving compassionate and safe care to patients in need.  While this can be rewarding it can also be depleting on the nurse's mind, body, and soul.  Therefore, it is imperative that nurses have self care practices that allow them to replenish their body, mind, and soul. Nurses simply cannot give of their healing energy if self care is not practiced and made a priority for sustenance. Burnout and compassion fatigue are real occupational hazards within the nursing profession that can lead to workplace injury. The American Nurses Association (ANA) revised 2015 Code of Ethics states that “self care is a moral imperative” for nurses.


​​Click Here to Read more